Top Ten Ranking Brian Leiter's Law School Rankings
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 ¶  The Most National Law School Based on Job Placement in Elite Law Firms, 2003
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Writing Essays

July 1, 2003

This study aims to assess which of the top schools have the most "national" placement, as measured by hiring by elite law firms around the country.  This study proceeds on the assumption that "national" law schools (1) place large numbers of graduates at the best firms, and (2) place graduates at the best firms throughout the nation.

We studied the usual suspects for the top law schools-Yale, Harvard, Stanford, Chicago, Columbia, NYU, Michigan, Virginia, Texas, Penn, Cornell, Georgetown, Northwestern, Duke--plus two schools on the cusp of this elite group, Vanderbilt and UCLA. [1]   As a check on the reliability of the results, we added five very reputable, but presumably less national schools:  Emory University, Washington & Lee University, University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and George Washington University.

To identify "elite" law firms, we used the Vault Guide to the Top 100 Law Firms, including the 23 "best of the rest" identified by Vault, top firms that didn't make the top 100.  In order to assess national placement power, we had to have a genuinely national sample.  Therefore, we studied only the top 3 firms in each city/region-- where there were at least three on the Vault list.  (The primary failing of the well-known American Lawyer study of hiring by the AMLAW 100 firms was that the sample was not national, with nearly one-third of the firms in New York City and more than two-thirds of the firms on the list in the Northeast corridor.  AMLAW 100 is informative as to job placement in New York and the Northeast, but says nothing about national placement power.)

Based on these selection criteria, we ended up with 45 elite law firms from around the country to study.  Organized by city/region, they are:

Atlanta Milwaukee

King & Spalding

Foley & Lardner

Alston & Bird

Minneapolis

Kilpatrick Stockton

Dorsey & Whitney
Boston New York

Hale and Dorr

Cravath, Swaine & Moore

Ropes & Gray

Wachtell, Lipton, Rosen & Katz

Goodwin Procter

Sullivan & Cromwell

Chicago Philadelphia

Kirkland & Ellis

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius

Sidley Austin Brown & Wood

Dechert

Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw

Drinker Biddle & Reath

Cleveland Pittsburgh

Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue

Kirkpatrick & Lockhart

Baker & Hostetler

Portland
Dallas

Miller Nash

Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld

Stoel Rives

Haynes and Boone

Richmond
District of Columbia

Hunton & Williams

Covington & Burling

McGuireWoods

Williams & Connolly

San Diego

Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering

Gray Cary Ware & Freidenrich

Houston San Francisco/Bay Area

Baker Botts

Morrison & Foerster

Fulbright & Jaworski

Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati

Vinson & Elkins

Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe

Los Angeles Seattle

Latham & Watkins

Perkins Coie

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher

Davis Wright Tremaine

O'Melveny & Myers

Foster Pepper & Shefelman

Miami/Florida St. Louis

Holland & Knight

Bryan Cave

Greenberg Traurig

 

The Martindale-Hubbell on-line database was then utilized to determine the number of graduates of the 22 schools in the study at these firms.   School names were searched in common variations (e.g., "Univ. of Chicago" and "University of Chicago"), and also in forms to avoid false positives (e.g., "University of Texas," instead of "Texas," to avoid picking up, e.g., "Texas Tech").  Where the results showed zero graduates at a firm, the results were double-checked using additional search formats.

Because school size varies considerably, we calculated the "per capita" score for each school, where the "per capita" score represents the total number of attorneys divided by the total number of yearly graduates as determined by the Official ABA Guide to Approved Schools and information (e.g., about graduating classes, size of JD and LLM programs) on school web sites.  Because the Martindale-Hubbell search engine does not distinguish between JD and LLM graduates, it was necessary to factor in LLM graduates for purposes of the per capita measure, especially since some schools (Harvard, Georgetown, NYU, George Washington, in particular) have large numbers of LLM graduates (which may figure in the wide dispersion of Georgetown, George Washington, and NYU graduates in particular:  students come from all over for these LLM programs (especially in tax at Georgetown and NYU, and intellectual property at GW) and then return to where they come from).  (LLM graduates were added for all schools, however, in calculating the per capita measure.)

Keep in mind that because the search looked for all graduates at a firm (not just new associates), law schools noticeably more prominent now than a generation ago may not perform as one would expect (NYU is the most obvious example).

In addition to calculating the per capita score, we also calculated the number of firms in the study with at least one graduate of a school; and the number of firms with five or more graduates.  All these results appear below.  (Note that other schools not studied might well have outperformed Washington & Lee, Notre Dame, George Washington, Minnesota and UCLA in these categories.)  Finally, we prepared a chart showing the distribution of graduates at elite firms in each city/region, noting, where possible, the percentage of graduates placed at elite firms peculiar to that school's region (e.g., Texas/Southwest, California, Northeast corridor etc.).

The National Law Schools
(in terms of Elite Firm job placement)

40% of this rank is based on the per capita rate of placement in elite law firms around the nation for each school.  Another 40% of the rank is based on the number of elite law firms around the nation that have at least one graduate of the school in the firm.  Finally, 20% of the rank is based on the number of elite law firms around the nation that have at least five graduates of the school in the firm; this factor was given less weight since it slightly favors larger schools.  (The rank in each category is given in the charts that follow.)  All scores were normalized, with the highest scorer in each category receiving 100, all others a percentage of the highest score.  So, e.g., one can say, very roughly, that based on this data, Vanderbilt is "half as national" in its placement power and prestige as Harvard, and so on.

Other pertinent measures of school "prestige" and "quality" are included for easy comparison.

Rank

School

Normalized Score

Faculty Quality Rank (2003)

Teaching Quality (2003)

Student Quality Rank (2000)

Placement in Law Teaching Rank (2002)

1

Harvard

100

  2 (4.7)

Adequate

  2

  2-3

2

Chicago

  88

  2 (4.7)

Outstanding

  4

  4-5

3

Yale

  86

  1 (4.8)

Good

  1

  1

4

Virginia

  82

10 (4.0)

Strong

  7

  6-8

5

Michigan

  76

  8 (4.1)

Adequate

  9

  4-5

6

Stanford

  72

  4 (4.5)

Adequate

  4

  2-3

7

Columbia

  71

  5 (4.3)

Adequate

  7

  6-8

8

Georgetown

  69

12 (3.8)

Adequate

11

10-15

9

Duke

  68

17 (3.5)

Adequate

13

10-15

10

Penn

  66

11 (3.9)

Adequate

10

10-15

11

NYU

  65

  5 (4.3)

Adequate

  3

  9

12

Texas

  56

  8 (4.1)

Outstanding

16

10-15

13

Northwestern

  53

14 (3.7)

Adequate

14

10-15

14

Vanderbilt

  49

18 (3.4)

Strong

16

16-20

15

Cornell

  47

14 (3.7)

Strong

14

10-15

16

Berkeley

  45

  7 (4.2)

Adequate

  6

 6-8

Other Schools Studied

 

George Washington

  44

22 (3.1)

Adequate

29

21-50

 

Minnesota

  42

21 (3.2)

Adequate

18

16-20

 

Notre Dame

  37

Runner-up for top 40 (2.4)

Outstanding

27

21-50

 

UCLA

  35

14 (3.7)

Adequate

12

16-20

 

Emory

  33

29 (2.8)

Good

33

21-50

 

Washington & Lee

  26

32 (2.7)

Strong

23

21-50

Five Things to Remember in Interpreting the Results

  1. Self-selection by students in choosing where to go to law school in the first place has a lot to do with the results.  Students who choose to go to Stanford or Columbia are probably, among other things, choosing based on lifestyle and regional loyalties:  this is reflected, unsurprisingly, in where graduates end up practicing.  (How many students choose to go to Stanford in order to practice in Cleveland or Pittsburgh?  How many pick Columbia with the goal of big firm practice in Dallas or Portland?)  By contrast, Michigan, with only a minority of Michigan residents in its student body, doesn't offer many attractive regional options (no Detroit firms make the Vault lists, for example), with the result that its students both come from all over and spread out all over.  The same might be said for Duke and Vanderbilt (no North Carolina or Tennessee firms make the Vault lists, either).  Something similar is also true for Virginia, which combines both a low number of in-state students with proximity, and traditional feeder relationships, to attractive legal markets in D.C. and New York, among many others. 

    Contrast these cases with Berkeley or Texas, which have very high in-state student populations, are in states with major legal markets, and, like Columbia and Stanford, tend to be chosen by many students who have distinct lifestyle preferences and regional loyalties. 

    So the bottom line is this:  a student utilizing this data shouldn't conclude that they should choose Vanderbilt over Boalt-remember Boalt's faculty is better, its placement in law teaching is better (an even more elite selection process), and its students largely choose to be in California and environs, which has a lot to do with why they choose Boalt in the first place.  The same could, of course, be said for Columbia, NYU, Stanford, and Texas, among others.

  2. Reputations die hard and are long in being born-especially among attorneys.  In 1970, the top five law schools were Harvard, Yale, and Michigan, with Columbia, Stanford, and Chicago fighting it out for the remaining two spots.  Penn was just on the cusp of the "top five," Virginia was clearly top ten, and then some mix of Duke, Northwestern, Texas, and Berkeley fought it out for the remaining top ten spots.  Cornell was surely top 15, NYU might have been top 15, Vanderbilt was surely top 20, and Georgetown might have been top 20.  UCLA was a brand new law school, just a half-dozen years old.

    Because this study looked at all attorneys at elite firms who graduated from any of the schools studied, it invariably reflects a school's reputation among elite firms over a long period of time, reflecting not only who Ropes & Gray was hiring in 1995, but some of whom they were hiring in 1970.  This goes a long distance to explaining NYU's showing, as well as Michigan's and Duke's.  (Duke also benefits from a highly inflated rating-relative to faculty quality-in U.S. News for most of the last decade.) 

  3. Size matter-- at the margins.  Without a doubt, two of the measures used in calculating the overall rank are sensitive to the number of graduates (both JDs and LLMs), and in that category, Georgetown leads even Harvard and NYU (the next two largest) by a margin of more than 200 graduates per year!  If Georgetown were the size, say, of Penn, it is likely that it would rank more like Cornell in this kind of study.  Notice, for example, that Georgetown is distinctly underrepresented at the most elite firms in its hometown of Washington, D.C.

  4. All 16 of these schools are genuinely national in their reputation and placement power.  The contrast with Washington & Lee (which, itself, is more national than most law schools) should make that clear.  (GW is on the cusp here, but its numbers are inflated by a large number of LLM graduates, and so does not deserve to be ranked with Berkeley and Cornell.)  And while big differences might be worth attending to (Michigan is twice as national as UCLA, but Duke is only slightly more national in its placement than Northwestern), the bottom line is that degrees from these 16 schools make you employable at the best private firms around the nation-and so you're better off choosing among these schools based on other considerations, like intellectual interests, special programs, cost, and lifestyle.  

  5. Elite firm placement is only one measure of national reputation and standing.  Placement in law teaching jobs, an even more selective process, is revealing.  So is placement in clerkships, placement in the most sought-after public sector jobs, and so on.  Rank for law teaching placement is included above, and some data on clerkships is available elsewhere on this site (see Supreme Court Clerkship Placement), but systematic data on all these possible measures of national standing is not presently available.

Rank Based on Per Capita Score for Elite Firm Placement

Rank School Per Capita Value

1

University of Chicago

2.28

2

Harvard University

2.11

3

Yale University

1.90

4

University of Virginia

1.50

5

Stanford University

1.41

6

University of Michigan

1.25

 

University of Pennsylvania

1.24

8

Columbia University

1.10

9

Duke University

1.02

10

University of Texas, Austin

0.92

11

Northwestern University

0.84

 

Univ. of California, Berkeley

0.85

13

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

0.78

14

Cornell University

0.73

 

New York University

0.73

 

Vanderbilt University

0.73

17

Emory University

0.68

 

Georgetown University

0.68

19

University of Minnesota

0.59

20

University of Notre Dame

0.46

 

Washington & Lee University

0.45

22

George Washington University

0.38

Rank Based on Number of Elite Firms with 5 or More Graduates

Rank School

# of Firms

1

Harvard University

44

2

Georgetown University

32

3

University of Virginia

31

4

New York University

30

 

Yale University

30

6

University of Michigan

28

7

Columbia University

26

8

University of Chicago

24

9

Duke University

22

 

Stanford University

22

11

University of Pennsylvania

21

12

University of Texas, Austin

16

13

George Washington University

13

14

Cornell University

12

 

Univ. of California, Berkeley

12

 

Vanderbilt University

12

17

Northwestern University

11

18

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

10

19

University of Minnesota

  7

20

University of Notre Dame

  6

21

Emory University

  3

22

Washington & Lee University

  2

Rank Based on Number of Elite Firms with at least 1 Graduate

Rank School

# of Firms

1

Georgetown University

45

 

Harvard University

45

3

University of Michigan

44

 

University of Virginia

44

5

Columbia University

43

 

Duke University

43

7

New York University

42

 

Yale University

42

9

Stanford University

40

10

University of Chicago

39

11

George Washington University

37

 

University of Pennsylvania

37

13

Cornell University

35

 

Northwestern University

35

15

University of Texas, Austin

34

16

Vanderbilt University

33

17

University of Notre Dame

28

18

Univ. of California, Berkeley

26

19

Emory University

21

20

University of Minnesota

20

21

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

18

 

Washington & Lee University

18

 Elite Firm Placement by City

Remember:  the numbers below reflect only placement at (at most) the top three "elite" firms in each city, and so do not necessarily indicate what proportions of graduates go to those cities.  So, for example, Cornell, George Washington and Georgetown (see below) turn out to be underrepresented at the most elite firms in their main markets (New York and DC).  Note also that the figures for NYU, George Washington and Georgetown include large numbers of LLM graduates.

Keep in mind that the number of graduates in a particular market should be considered relative to the number of graduates trying to go to that market, not the total number of attorneys at these 45 elite firms.  Schools like Boalt and Texas-and to a lesser extent, Stanford, Columbia, and NYU, among others--have relatively small percentages of their class looking to leave the region, for the reasons noted earlier.

No regional placement percentages could be calculated for the following schools:  Michigan, Vanderbilt, Notre Dame, Duke.  In each case, no firms in the most important regional markets (Detroit, Nashville, Indianapolis, Raleigh, Charlotte) made the Vault list.

City

Harv

Chic

Yale

UVA

Mich

Stan

Colum

Georgetown

Atlanta

   74

  13

  17

   72

  19

    5

    7

  13

Boston

 290

  25

  30

   43

  27

  14

  57

  27

Chicago

 167

223

  41

   37

115

  26

  39

  68

Cleveland

   20

    5

    3

   11

  33

    0

    7

  14

Dallas

   10

    3

    1

     6

    1

    4

    6

    5

D.C.

 192

  46

  93

   62

  42

  25

  45

  15

Houston

   67

  12

  18

   27

    9

  13

  13

  15

Los Angeles

 169

  62

  65

   49

  73

  65

100

104

Miami/FL

   22

    5

    7

   16

    4

    4

  13

    6

Milwaukee

   25

  22

  13

    6

  28

    7

    2

  10

Minneapolis

   27

    6

    5

    5

  15

    4

    2

  10

New York

 185

  28

  70

  28

  13

  19

164

  13

Philadelphia

   45

  11

    8

  30

  11

    6

  21

  26

Pittsburgh

   16

    3

    9

    5

  10

    4

    4

    2

Portland

   18

    4

    6

    7

  19

  16

    4

    9

Richmond

   16

    4

    7

123

  11

    1

    1

    8

San Diego

     6

    0

    1

    6

    7

  11

    1

    3

San Fran /Bay Area

   91

  34

  37

  19

  25

  78

  33

  41

Seattle

   36

  15

  15

  11

  24

  18

  12

  30

St. Louis

   13

    3

    3

    4

    8

    0

    5

    7

Total:

1476

524

454

569

514

311

536

535

% of elite firm placement in regional markets:

48%

49%

44%

55%

N/a

48%

54%

15%



City

Duke

Penn

NYU

Texas

NWU

Boalt

Corn

Vandy

Atlanta

  34

  13

  16

 16

    5

    5

    6

 65

Boston

  27

  27

  49

   5

    6

    6

  49

   1

Chicago

  30

  23

  61

 17

177

    5

  14

   7

Cleveland

  14

    4

  15

   1

    5

    0

  10

   2

Dallas

    5

    1

    5

 55

    2

    1

    0

 10

D.C.

  34

  37

  32

 16

  13

    6

    4

   8

Houston

  17

    2

  23

309

    5

    1

    3

 20

Los Angeles

  35

  38

  82

 25

  23

  84

  23

   8

Miami/FL

  11

  12

  27

   0

    2

    0

    2

   3

Milwaukee

    4

    2

    3

   1

  13

    1

    3

   1

Minneapolis

    6

    2

    9

   2

    4

    1

    3

   4

New York

  12

  38

121

   9

    5

    8

  14

   2

Philadelphia

    9

162

  21

   2

    3

    5

    6

   4

Pittsburgh

    6

  10

    4

   1

    3

    0

    6

   6

Portland

    4

    2

    1

   0

    3

    9

    4

   2

Richmond

    6

    3

    5

   9

    1

    0

    4

   5

San Diego

    0

    1

    1

   0

    1

    8

    0

   1

San Fran /Bay Area

  18

  10

  56

   8

  18

104

  19

   7

Seattle

    8

    5

    8

   6

  11

  11

    4

   5

St. Louis

    3

    2

    8

   0

    5

    0

    0

   5

Total:

283

397

476

482

294

255

175

161

% of elite firm placement in regional markets

N/a

67%

47%

76%

68%

77%

42%

n/a



City

Geo.
Washington

Minn.

Notre Dame

UCLA

Emory

W&L

Atlanta

   17

     0

  11

    2

130

10

Boston

   25

     1

    0

    0

    5

  0

Chicago

   28

   27

  23

  10

    2

  3

Cleveland

     4

     2

  15

    0

    1

  0

Dallas

     2

     5

    1

    0

    2

  3

D.C.

   39

     0

    1

    3

    1

  5

Houston

     5

     0

    4

    3

    1

  1

Los Angeles

   24

   18

    4

153

    5

  1

Miami/FL

     9

     1

    1

    0

    3

  3

Milwaukee

     3

     6

    2

    0

    0

  0

Minneapolis

     4

   89

    2

    0

    0

  0

New York

   13

     3

    1

    8

    4

  0

Philadelphia

     7

     4

    1

    0

    2

  1

Pittsburgh

     4

     0

    3

    0

    2

  1

Portland

     0

     0

    2

    3

    0

  0

Richmond

     7

     0

    1

    0

    5

30

San Diego

     2

     0

    1

  10

    0

  0

San Fran /Bay Area

   10

     8

    6

  37

    3

  0

Seattle

     5

     3

    4

  10

    0

  2

St. Louis

     4

     1

    4

    0

    0

  0

Total

 210

 167

  87

238

167

59

% of elite firm placement in regional markets

40%

 73%

N/a

80%

78%

76%

HIRING BY SOME VERY SELECTIVE FIRMS

Is Cravath, Swaine & Moore (New York City) the most selective firm in the country?  Perhaps, perhaps not.  But it is clearly among the most selective, and so its hiring practices shed some light on how it views law schools, especially those outside its region.  Cravath, unlike most firms, also makes it possible to search attorneys at the firm based on where they went to law school.  (Cravath also severely underreports attorneys-associates--to Martindale-Hubbell, which is why the figures here differ.  Of course, there is no reason to think the underreporting to Martindale-Hubbell systematically favors one school over any others, which is why that data is still useful for an overall picture.)  Here is where Cravath attorneys got their JD or LLM (there are lots of LLMs among the NYU and Georgetown numbers, for example):

Rank

School

# of Cravath Attorneys

1

Harvard University

110

2

Columbia University

  88

3

New York University

  59

4

Fordham University

  28

5

Yale University

  24

6

University of Pennsylvania

  19

7

Georgetown University

  16

 

University of Chicago

  16

9

University of Texas, Austin

  11

10

University of Virginia

    9

11

Boston University

    8

 

Cornell University

    8

13

Brooklyn Law School

    7

14

University of California, Berkeley

    5

15

Northwestern University

    4

 

University of Michigan

    4

17

Duke University

    3

 

Rutgers University, Newark

    3

19

Cardozo Law School

    2

 

Stanford University

    2

 

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

    2

22

Emory University

    1

 

George Washington University

    1

 

Seton Hall University

    1

 

University of Iowa

    1

 

University of Notre Dame

    1

Other Schools in this Study

 

University of Minnesota

   0

 

University of Southern California

   0

 

Vanderbilt University

   0

 

Washington & Lee University

   0

Of selective firms in Washington, D.C., Kellogg, Huber, Hansen, Todd & Evans, a boutique telecommunications firm, may lead the pack:  their roster is packed with former Supreme Court clerks, law review editors, and attorneys with high-level government experience.  Kellogg, Huber is also small enough to make it possible, even without a search engine, to determine where their attorneys went to law school.  The smallness also, of course, affects the import of the results.

Rank

School

# of Kellogg Attorneys

1

Harvard University

13

2

Columbia University

  3

 

Georgetown University

  3

 

University of Texas, Austin

  3

5

Cornell University

  2

 

Yale University

  2

7

Boston University

  1

 

Catholic University

  1

 

George Washington University

  1

 

New York University

  1

 

Stanford University

  1

 

University of Chicago

  1

 

All other schools:

  0

A larger, but still highly selective Washington, D.C. firm that has a search engine similar to Cravath's is Wilmer, Cutler & Pickering.  Here are all law schools with at least 3 attorneys in the D.C. office:

Rank

School

# of Wilmer Attorneys

1

Harvard University

54

2

Georgetown University

31

3

Yale University

27

4

Duke University

18

5

University of Pennsylvania

15

 

University of Virginia

15

7

University of Chicago

14

 

University of Michigan

14

9

George Washington University

12

 

Stanford University

12

11

Columbia University

11

12

American University

  7

 

New York University

  7

 

Vanderbilt University

  7

15

University of Texas, Austin

  6

16

Catholic University

  4

 

Cornell University

  4

 

University of North Carolina

  4

19

Boston University

  3

 

Univ. of California, Berkeley

  3

 

University of Iowa

  3

Other Schools in this Study

 

Emory University

  0

 

Northwestern University

  1

 

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

  2

 

University of Minnesota

  0

 

University of Notre Dame

  0

 

University of Southern California

  0

 

Washington & Lee University

  1

On the opposite coast, the elite Los Angeles firm of O'Melveny & Myers does have a search engine similar to Cravath which makes it possible to determine where O'Melveny goes to hire legal talent.  All schools with at least 3 attorneys in the LA office are listed.

Rank

School

# of O'Melveny Attorneys

1

Harvard University

32

 

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles

32

3

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

29

4

Univ. of California, Berkeley

19

5

University of Southern California

17

6

Yale University

14

7

Stanford University

13

8

Univ. of California, Hastings

10

9

Columbia University

  7

 

University of Virginia

  7

11

University of Michigan

  6

12

Georgetown University

  5

 

New York University

  5

 

Southwestern University

  5

 

University of Oregon

  5

 

University of Texas, Austin

  5

17

George Washington University

  4

 

Pepperdine University

  4

 

University of Washington, Seattle

  4

20

Cornell University

  3

 

Duke University

  3

 

Northwestern University

  3

 

University of Chicago

  3

Other Schools in this Study

 

Emory University

  0

 

University of Minnesota

  0

 

University of Notre Dame

  0

 

University of Pennsylvania

  0

 

Vanderbilt University

  2

 

Washington & Lee University

  0

A smaller Los Angeles firm, but, like Kellogg Huber, highly selective is Munger, Tolles & Olson.  Here are all law schools with at least two attorneys at the Los Angeles office of this prestigious firm:

Rank

School

# of Munger Attorneys

1

Yale University

20

2

Harvard University

19

3

Stanford University

17

4

University of Southern California

14

5

Univ. of California, Berkeley

13

6

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

11

7

Columbia University

  7

8

University of Michigan

  6

9

Georgetown University

  5

 

University of Chicago

  5

11

Loyola Law School, Los Angeles

  2

 

Univ. of California, Hastings

  2

Other Schools in this Study

 

Cornell University

  1

 

Duke University

  0

 

Emory University

  0

 

George Washington University

  0

 

New York University

  1

 

Northwestern University

  1

 

University of Minnesota

  0

 

University of Notre Dame

  0

 

University of Pennsylvanlia

  0

 

University of Texas, Austin

  1

 

University of Virginia

  0

 

Vanderbilt University

  1

 

Washington & Lee University

  0

When we go north in California, we find that the elite San Francisco firm of Morrison & Foerster also has a useful search engine.  What follows is a list of all schools with at least 3 (JD) graduates working as attorneys in the San Francisco office.  It is particularly striking here that regional schools like San Francisco, Santa Clara, and Golden Gate did not have as many attorneys here as non-regional schools like Minnesota, Emory, and Duke.

Rank

School

# of Morrison Attorneys

1

Univ. of California, Berkeley

44

2

Univ. of California, Hastings

32

3

Stanford University

22

4

Harvard University

21

5

Yale University

18

6

Univ. of California, Los Angeles

15

7

New York University

11

8

University of Chicago

10

 

University of Michigan

10

10

Cornell University

  9

 

Northwestern University

  9

12

Columbia University

  7

13

Georgetown University

  6

 

Univ. of California, Davis

  6

15

University of Minnesota

  5

16

University of Texas, Austin

  4

 

University of Virginia

  4

18

Duke University

  3

 

Emory University

  3

 

McGeorge School of Law

  3

Other Schools in the Study

 

George Washington University

  1

 

University of Notre Dame

  0

 

University of Pennsylvania

  1

 

University of Southern California

  0

 

Vanderbilt University

  0

 

Washington & Lee University

  0

Unfortunately, none of the elite Chicago firms had appropriate search engines, and so no data could be collected for them.  We held off collecting data on elite Houston firms, like Vinson & Elkins and Fulbright & Jaworski, since the results are, to some extent, predictable.  Other firms may be added in the near future.


[1] Southern California belongs at least here, if not higher, based on faculty quality, and may be added at a later date to the study.

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