Top Ten Ranking Brian Leiter's Law School Rankings

 ¶  Brian Leiter's Educational Quality Ranking of U.S. Law Schools, 1999-2000
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November 1999

Brian Leiter's Educational Quality Ranking (hereafter "EQR") of U.S. law schools has emerged, since its debut in 1997, as the most widely discussed law school rankings after those published by U.S. News. The EQR is the only national ranking developed by a legal educator, someone with an insider's knowledge of law schools.

The March 1998 issue of the American Bar Association Journal: The Lawyer's Magazine identified the EQR as one "of the better-known law school rankings." The National Law Journal (June 2, 1997) ran a front-page story on the EQR, reporting that this new ranking was "being praised as a more reasonable alternative by a number of law school deans." The rankings have been featured in newspapers around the country, as well as in various legal journals and the professional newsletters of the Midwest Association of Pre-Law Advisers and the Northeast Association of Pre-Law Advisers. The EQR site has received thousands of visits, and has become a popular source of information for prospective students at the nation's leading colleges and universities.

Unlike most other law-school rankings, the EQR focuses exclusively on the three factors central to a good legal education: the quality of the faculty, the quality of the student body, and the quality of teaching.

The 1999-2000 "Ranking of U.S. Law Schools by Educational Quality" has been changed in two major respects:

(1) Membership in the American Law Institute is no longer counted. Although a traditional badge of distinction in the legal academy, consideration of ALI membership skewed some results last year (e.g. the ranking of Stanford), that detracted from the overall value of the rankings. Several law professors also contacted me contesting the meaningfulness of small differences in total ALI membership.

(2) This year's ranking incorporates the results of a comprehensive study of faculty quality that will appear in The Journal of Legal Studies (January 2000). This study reflects faculty affiliations for 98-99, and employed both objective and subjective reputational measures of faculty quality. It is the most comprehensive, reliable and up- to-date study of faculty quality available, and even before appearing has already generated considerable discussion and comment.

Keep in mind that all rankings reflect contestable judgments about criteria and their relative importance. Thus, all rankings should be used with caution and with attention to what exactly they purport to measure. This ranking focusses exclusively on traditional academic criteria. Such criteria count for less than half of the well-known U.S. News rankings, by contrast. Academically serious and ambitious students, who embark upon the study of law with a sense of intellectual excitement, are likely to find the EQR of most value.

THE CRITERIA

The final rank of a law school is based on its performance in three categories:

Faculty Quality (70% of final rank): the rank in this category is based on three criteria: scholarly productivity; scholarly impact of faculty work; and reputation. More precisely, the rank is based on the per capita rate of publication for the period 1995 through July 1998 (1) of articles in the ten leading student-edited law reviews and the ten leading peer-edited law journals, and (2) of books from the three leading law publishers and the eight leading academic presses (25%); the per capita rate of scholarly impact for the top quarter of each faculty based on citations to faculty work on the Westlaw JLR database as of July 1998 (25%); and the subjective academic reputation of the faculty based on a fall 1998 survey of academics conducted by U.S. News & World Report (50%). Each measure of faculty quality has advantages and limitations, but together they promise to present an informative picture. The rationale for the particular weightings, and the details of the study methodology, can be found in Brian Leiter, "Measuring the Academic Distinction of Law Faculties," Journal of Legal Studies (forthcoming January 2000).

Since the time the faculty quality data was collected one major faculty move has occurred that affects the results for one school substantially: Philip Frickey at Minnesota accepted an offer from Berkeley. Because the Minnesota faculty is small, and because Frickey was clearly one of the three most important members of that faculty, his departure lowers Minnesota's rank noticeably. (Berkeley, as a larger and stronger faculty, certainly benefits from hiring Frickey, but his impact, in terms of objective criteria, on Berkeley's rank is negligible.) As a result, I have had to go back to the original data and make certain adjustments to reflect the loss of Frickey. In that one respect, the results here differ slightly from the results in the forthcoming Journal of Legal Studies article.

Student Quality (30% of final rank): the rank in this category is based on data collected by the American Bar Association on student credentials for 1998 for the 75th and 25th percentile of the entering class. The EQR employs the U.S. News formula, except giving somewhat more weight to LSAT: 60% of the score is for 75th/25th LSAT, 40% for 75th/25th GPA. Note that, unlike last year, the measure is no longer confined to the top half of the class. This runs the risk of penalizing state schools and schools with aggressive alternative admissions procedures, but student comments on last year's EQR convinced me that looking at 75th and 25th percentile presents a more realistic portrait of the student body as a whole.

Even the data on the 75th and 25th percentile, however, can still give a skewed picture in some respects. For example, at Texas while the 75th percentile LSAT is 164, the 90th percentile is 168, an unusually large gap between the 75th and 90th percentiles. Because Texas is so much larger than most peer schools, that means that there are about 50 students in the entering class with scores 168 or higher. Contrast this with much smaller schools, like Washington & Lee and the University of Washington, which report 75th percentiles of 166. In reality, that translates in to about 30 students with scores 166 or higher at Washington & Lee, and about 40 students at Washington--far fewer actual students than are at Texas with an even higher LSAT. For obvious reasons, it's easier to boost the 75th percentile numbers at smaller schools than larger ones, but it may not present the most accurate portrait of the student body (contrast, for example, the ranking of schools by placement as clerks on the U.S. Supreme Court, below).

Teaching Quality was last year treated as 10% of the final rank, but many readers of the EQR correctly complained that the data was too limited and too crude to warrant this kind of quantification. This year, several years worth of Princeton Review Surveys of Student Satisfaction with Teaching are used to give "extra credit" to strong teaching faculties. Nine schools have quite consistently gotten high marks for teaching quality in these surveys year after year: Boston University, University of Chicago, University of Notre Dame, University of Texas, Cornell University, College of William & Mary, University of Virginia, Vanderbilt University, and Washington & Lee University. These schools were, accordingly, pushed ahead one rank based on teaching quality. So, for example, Virginia was ranked 9th based on student quality and faculty quality, but is ranked 8th because of its reputation for teaching excellence. So too, Chicago and Yale tied for 1st based on student quality and faculty quality, but Chicago was nudged ahead, to occupy the #1 spot by itself, based on its reputation for teaching excellence.

Faculty quality is given more weight than student quality because (1) it is the traditional measure of the academic caliber of an institution, (2) it correlates more reliably with reputation and prestige than any other factor, (3) it is less likely to produce a ranking that becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, and (4) some schools have notorious reputations for boosting the numerical credentials of the student body artificially (e.g. by admitting the Phys Ed majors with 4.0 GPAs and the like, or by making LSAT-driven admissions decisions). (Among the leading law schools, NYU is most often mentioned as the worst offender on this score.) The faculty quality measure is more sensitive to actual faculty quality and actual changes in faculty quality. Student quality largely tracks perceived prestige--hence the self-fulfilling prophecy aspect if rankings weight it heavily. Schools historically favored by U.S. News because of that magazine's use of criteria that reward small, private institutions typically have far stronger student bodies than measures of faculty quality would predict (see, for example, the results for Duke and Washington & Lee, below).

It would be useful to be able to include data on reputation among practitioners. Unfortunately, no remotely reliable data exists. Because practitioner reputation is much more regional than academic reputation, any reputational survey that is not geographically balanced in very careful ways will produce meaningless results. (The U.S. News editors have admitted to me in discussion that their reputational surveys of practitioners are not geographically balanced.)

BRIAN LEITER'S EDUCATIONAL QUALITY RANKING vs. U.S. NEWS

The EQR continues to omit consideration of tangential or prejudicial criteria, of the sort that mar the U.S. News results every year. For example, U.S. News assigns weight in the final rank to per capita expenditures, a criterion which rewards inefficiency and systematically favors small schools over large schools, since the latter enjoy obvious economies of scale.

Similarly, U.S. News assigns weight in the final rank to spending on financial aid, a factor which seriously prejudices all state law schools, which charge lower tuitions in the first place and thus spend less on financial aid. Yet low tuition is a factor nowhere credited by U.S. News.

U.S. News employs only subjective measures of reputation, which often reflect hearsay and out-of-date information; U.S. News assigns no weight at all to teaching quality.

The EQR does omit job placement rates, which U.S. News includes. Unfortunately, there is simply no way--as even U.S. News admits--to verify the accuracy of the placement data schools report: U.S. News relies on an "honor" system, yet all the incentives invite dishonorable conduct. If U.S. News, for example, were to be believed, it would appear that the University of Kentucky and Loyola University-Chicago have better placement records than Yale, Harvard, Stanford, and Chicago. Such absurd "results" counsel against employing putative placement data in ranking law schools. All the schools that provide a quality legal education--as measured by the criteria identified above--are schools that, without exception, enjoy a high success rate in placing their graduates. The top 15--the traditional "elite" law schools--all place nationally. [1] The ABA publishes employment data, and this is likely to be more reliable, but because the rates at which schools ascertain the employment rates of their graduates vary, even these figures are hard to interpret. Some very good schools report surprisingly high rates of "unemployed graduates seeking work"--for example, Harvard (2.4%) and Michigan (3.9%)--while weaker schools report lower rates to the ABA (for example, Duke [.5%] and North Carolina [.5%]).

In short, by concentrating exclusively on the factors central to a good legal education--quality of the faculty and student body --and by omitting irrelevant and prejudicial criteria, the EQR eliminates the biases against public law schools that are the distinguishing characteristic of the annual U.S. News rankings. Thus, the EQR ranks 14 public schools among the top 30 in the nation, while U.S. news ranks only 10. If we exclude Michigan and Virginia, which are only nominally public law schools (they admit relatively few in-state residents, charge tuitions more like private schools, and operate largely or entirely with private money), here is how the 12 genuinely public law schools in the EQR top 30 fare by comparison to how they are treated by U.S. News:

UC Berkeley + 2 U of Iowa - 1
U of Texas + 4 U of Wisconsin + 4
U of Minnesota + 1 U of Arizona +10
UCLA + 1 UC Davis + 5
U of Colorado +25 UC Hastings no change
U of Illinois + 2 William & Mary + 2

A RANKING OF U.S. LAW SCHOOLS BY EDUCATIONAL QUALITY, 1999-2000

Rank    School Cost (Resident/Non-resident)
1. University of Chicago $ 25,527
2. Yale University $ 25,550
3. Harvard University $ 24,586
4. Stanford University $ 25,190
5. Columbia University $ 27,156
5. New York University $ 27,055
7. University of Michigan $ 17,910 / $23,880
8. University of California, Berkeley $ 10,814 / $20,198
8. University of Virginia $ 14,606 / $20,706
10. Cornell University $ 24,148
11. University of Pennsylvania $ 25,780
11. University of Texas, Austin $   7,234 / $15,064
13. Georgetown University $ 24,530
13. Northwestern University $ 23,974
15. Duke University $ 24,939
15. University of California, Los Angeles $ 10,972 / $20,356
17. University of Minnesota $   9,630 / $15,930
18. University of Southern California $ 25,052
18. Vanderbilt University $ 23,010
20. University of Colorado $   5,412 / $17,086
21. George Washington University $ 23,955
21. University of Illinois $   8,456 / $18,830
21. University of Notre Dame $ 21,527
24. University of Iowa $   6,510 / $16,426
25. University of Wisconsin, Madison $   6,206 / $16,382
26. University of Arizona $   4,538 / $11,490
27. Boston University $ 23,138
27. University of California, Davis $ 10,859 / $19,843
29. University of California, Hastings $ 11,167 / $19,937
30. College of William & Mary $   8,494 / $17,940
30. Emory University $ 23,376
32. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill      $   3,169 / $15,269
32. Washington & Lee University $ 17,711
34. Washington University, St. Louis $ 23,120
35. Boston College $ 23,480
35. University of Utah $   4,607 / $10,249
35. University of Washington, Seattle $   5,763 / $14,169
38. Fordham University $ 23,790
38. Indiana University, Bloomington $   6,627 / $16,461
38. University of Georgia $   4,200 / $14,940
38. University of Miami $ 21,956
38. Wake Forest University $ 20,450
43. Ohio State University $   7,720 / $17,516
44. Chicago-Kent College of Law
/Illinois Institute of Technology
$ 20,760
44. Tulane University $ 23,588
46. University of Florida $   4,311 / $14,330
47. George Mason University $   7,644 / $18,214
47. Rutgers University, Newark $ 10,740/ $15,264
49. University of Pittsburgh $ 12,392 / $19,098
49. University of San Diego $ 20,980

Comparative Rankings for the Top 25

Brian Leiter's EQR U.S. News Insider's Guide Gourman Report
 1.   Chicago 6 6 4
 2.   Yale 1 1 3
 3.   Harvard 2 2 1
 4.   Stanford 2 4 6
 5.   Columbia 5 5 7
 5.   NYU 4 9 11
 7.   U of Michigan 8 3 2
 8.   UC Berkeley 10 7 5
 8.   U of Virginia 7 8 16
10. Cornell 10 15 10
11. Penn 12 10 9
11. U of Texas 15 11 12
13. Georgetown 14 13 17
13. Northwestern 12 16 14
15. Duke 8 12 8
15. UCLA 16 14 13
17. U of Minnesota 18 17 19
18. So. California 18 22 27
18. Vanderbilt 16 21 15
20. U of Colorado 45 not in top 30 not in top 50
21. George Wash. 25 20 32
21. U of Illinois 23 23 38
21. Notre Dame 21 n/a 18
24. U of Iowa 23 n/a 21
25. U of Wisconsin 29 18 22

BREAKDOWN BY CATEGORY

Overall Faculty Quality (by subjective and objective criteria)

Brian Leiter's Top 50
Law Faculties Overall
Subjective Rank     Objective Rank
 
1.  University of Chicago   2   1
2. Harvard University   1   3
2. Yale University   2   2
4. Stanford University   2   4
5. Columbia University   2   7
6. New York University   8   6
7. University of Michigan   6   9
8. Cornell University 12   5
9. University of California, Berkeley   6 12
10. University of Virginia   9 10
11. University of Texas, Austin 12 11
12. University of Pennsylvania   9 15
13. Northwestern University 12 14
14. Georgetown University 15 16
14. University of Minnesota 18 13
16. Duke University 11 22
17. University of California, Los Angeles   16 19
18. University of Southern California 19 17
19. University of Illinois 23 18
20. University of Iowa 19 23
21. Vanderbilt University 17 26
22. University of Colorado 39   8
23. University of Wisconsin 19 29
24. George Washington University 24 25
25. University of Arizona 35 19
26. Boston University 27 32
27. University of California, Davis 24 36
27. University of Notre Dame 27 33
29. University of California, Hastings 24 37
30. College of William & Mary 35 30
30. Washington University, St. Louis 27 38
32. Emory University 27 39
33. University of Miami 46 21
34. University of North Carolina 19 49
35. Wake Forest University 42 27
36. Indiana University, Bloomington 27 45
37. University of Utah 46 31
38. Chicago-Kent College of Law 52 28
38. Washington & Lee University 27 53
40. Boston College 27 54
40. Tulane University 35 46
40. University of Georgia 39 42
43. Fordham University 42 41
43. Ohio State University 35 48
45. University of Washington, Seattle 27 60
46. University of Florida 39 52
47. Rutgers University, Newark 52 43
48. University of Pittsburgh 46 51
49. George Mason University 75 24
49. University of San Diego 65 34

Two schools that basically performed comparably to George Mason and San Diego, and thus really deserve to be in the top 50, are Rutgers-Camden (average rank of 50; subjective rank of 65, objective rank of 35) and Yeshiva University/Cardozo Law School (average rank of 50; subjective rank of 60; objective rank of 40).

One anomalous result was that Duke ranked, for the first time ever, ahead of Cornell, Northwestern, and Texas in subjective reputation--schools it at best tied with, and typically trailed, in prior years. One possible explanation (given Duke's weaker showing by objective measures of faculty quality) is that repeated rankings of Duke in the top 10 by U.S. News for reasons unrelated to faculty quality have affected subjective perceptions even among academics.

Ranking by Quality of Student Body

Based on 75th and 25th percentile scores for the fall 1998 class: 60% of the rank is based on LSAT, 40% is based on GPA. As noted earlier, it is of course easier for smaller schools to boost the 75th percentile numbers than larger schools: thus, we find that all the schools with surprisingly "strong" student bodies by the measures employed here are unusually small (e.g. Washington-Seattle, Washington & Lee, Colorado). Hence, I list total size of the student body for purposes of comparison. Please note that the list is confined to the top 50 schools by overall quality.

Having taught at the #1, #17, and #46 schools on this list, I can offer the following observation from personal experience: there is a more dramatic difference in student quality between #46 and #17 than between #17 and #1. Indeed, among the stronger students, there is essentially no difference between #17 and #1. (This may, admittedly, be a peculiarity of Texas, given the exceptional credentials of the strong end of the class [see the date above regarding 75th and 90th percentile scores].) The most noticeable differences at each school are found at the bottom of the class: the bottom at #1 is noticeably stronger than at #17, and so forth. The conclusion is hard to escape, given my experience, that above a certain LSAT/GPA threshhold, differences in numerical credentials make little difference in actual student ability and potential.

Rank   
School Total student
body size
1. Yale University   593
2. Harvard University 1,658
3. University of Chicago   560
4. New York University 1,355
5. Stanford University   541
6. Columbia University 1,132
7. University of Virginia 1,105
8. University of California, Berkeley   846
9. University of Pennsylvania   766
10. Georgetown University 2,030
10. University of Michigan 1,030
12. University of California, Los Angeles   976
13. Cornell University   543
14. Duke University   608
15. Northwestern University   646
15. University of Washington, Seattle   489
17. University of Minnesota   744
17. University of Southern California   621
17. University of Texas, Austin 1,374
20. Washington & Lee University   366
21. University of Notre Dame   538
21. Vanderbilt University   548
23. George Washington University 1,403
23. University of Colorado   487
25. Fordham University 1,108
26. Boston College   823
27. Emory University   642
28. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill   690
29. University of California, Davis   503
29. University of California, Hastings 1,146
31. University of Georgia   633
32. College of William & Mary   528
32. University of Arizona   460
32. University of Utah   349
35. Ohio State University   640
36. Boston University   939
36. University of Illinois   592
38. University of Wisconsin, Madison   805
39. University of Florida 1,123
39. University of Iowa   654
39. Washington University, St. Louis   622
42. Indiana University, Bloomington   622
42. Wake Forest University   469
44. George Mason University   741
44. Tulane University   943
46. University of San Diego   980
47. Rutgers University, Newark   688
47. University of Miami 1,027
49. University of Pittsburgh   722
50. Chicago-Kent College of Law
/Illinois Institute of Technology
1,003

SUPREME COURT CLERKSHIP PLACEMENT

Since 1996 (through the 1999-2000 term), this is how the nation's law schools rank for placement of graduates as clerks on the United States Supreme Court, the most prestigious job available to a recent law graduate. The number of clerks during this time period appears in parentheses.

1. Harvard University (32)
2. Yale University (27)
3. University of Chicago (18)
4. Columbia University (13)
5. Stanford University (9)
6. University of Michigan (6)
7. Northwestern University (5)
7. University of Texas, Austin (5)
7. University of Virginia (5)
10. Georgetown University (4)
11. New York University (3)
11. University of Notre Dame (3)
13. Duke University (2)
14. Brigham Young University (1)
14. Fordham University (1)
14. Rutgers University, Newark (1)
14. University of Arizona (1)
14. University of California, Los Angeles (1)
14. University of North Carolina (1)
14. University of Pennsylvania (1)
14. Vanderbilt University (1)

Bear in mind that Harvard, Chicago, Columbia, and Northwestern enjoy the advantage of having former faculty now sitting as U.S. Supreme Court Justices. (Justice Breyer, for example, only took Harvard students as clerks for the 1999 term; he is a former member of the Harvard faculty.) Of the nation's leading law schools, only Cornell and Berkeley have had no Supreme Court clerks in recent years. It is also striking how poorly Supreme Court placement correlates with purported "student quality" (above). Obviously, the Justices know something that the numbers miss.

MAJOR LAW SCHOOL FACULTY MOVES SINCE 1995

This list records lateral moves of faculty since 1995 at the top 25 law schools (in terms of faculty quality)--plus several perennial top 25 contenders--for the indicated period. The major hires from 1980-1994 are an illustrative, but not a complete listing: I've confined the list to five faculty at each school (if there were that many). Where the information was available, I list current "serious" visiting professors for 1999-2000 (i.e. faculty being considered seriously for permanent appointment). This latter information is less reliable and less comprehensive than the other information printed below.

"Total faculty size" for each school is also listed, since the degree of movement (in and out of a school) is obviously related to total faculty size. Indeed, the schools that have lost the highest percentage of faculty in the last five years are:

  • Northwestern University (29%)
  • University of Chicago (29%)
  • University of Arizona (22%)
  • University of Southern California (18.2%)
  • University of Virginia (14.3%)
  • University of Michigan (12.1%)
  • University of Minnesota (12.1%)

Note, however, that Chicago and Michigan added as many faculty laterally as they lost, though all the others suffered a net loss.


BOSTON UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Keith Hylton from Northwestern University
Maria Hylton from DePaul University
Gary Lawson from Northwestern University
David Lyons from Cornell University (emeritus at Cornell)
Nancy Moore from Rutgers University, Camden
Theodore Sims from George Washington University

Lost to other schools:

David Dana to Northwestern University
Richard McAdams to the University of Illinois
Sai Prakash (untenured) to the University of San Diego.

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Randy Barnett from Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute of Technology
Robert G. Bone from the University of Southern California
Wendy Gordon from Rutgers University, Newark
Susan Koniak from the University of Pittsburgh
Larry Yackle from the University of Alabama

Total faculty size:   46


COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

José Alvarez from the University of Michigan.
Brian Barry from the London School of Economics (joint with Political Science and Philosophy)
Kimberle Crenshaw from the University of California, Los Angeles
Michael Dorf (untenured) from Rutgers University, Camden
Cynthia Estlund from the University of Texas, Austin
Samuel Issacharoff from the University of Texas, Austin
Avery Katz from Georgetown University
Curtis Milhaupt from Washington University, St. Louis
Joseph Raz from Oxford University (part-time appointment)
Charles Sabel from the Department of Political Science, Massachussetts Institute
     of Technology
Carol Sanger from Santa Clara University
Jeremy Waldron from the Department of Politics, Princeton University.

Lost to other schools:

Anne Alstott to Yale University
Bernard Black to Stanford University
Martha Fineman to Cornell University
Richard Pierce, Jr. to George Washington University
Michael Young to George Washington University (to become Dean)

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Vincent Blasi from the University of Michigan
George Fletcher from the University of California, Los Angeles
Jeffrey N. Gordon from New York University
David Leebron from New York University
Henry Monaghan from Boston University

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Amy Chua from Duke University
Jules Coleman from Yale University
Katherine Francke from Fordham University
Maureen O'Rourke from Boston University
Susan Sturm from the University of Pennsylvania
Mark Tushnet from Georgetown University

Total faculty size:   59


CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Kathryn Abrams from Northwestern University
Martha Fineman from Columbia University
Lee Teitelbaum from the University of Utah (as Dean)

Lost to other schools:

Lynn LoPucki to the University of California, Los Angeles
David Lyons to Boston University (emeritus at Cornell)
Fred McChesney to Northwestern University
Russell Osgood to Grinnell College (to become President)

Offers outstanding to

Susan Koniak at Boston University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Gregory S. Alexander from the University of Georgia
Theodore Eisenberg from the University of California, Los Angeles
Jonathan R. Macey from the University of Chicago
Steven H. Shiffrin from the University of California, Los Angeles
Katharine van Wezel Stone from Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University

Total faculty size:   41


DUKE UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Michael H. Bradley from the University of Michigan (primary appt. in Business School at Duke)
James Coleman from practice
Frances McGovern from the University of Alabama
Steven Schwarcz from practice

Lost to other schools:

Stanley Fish to the University of Illinois at Chicago (to become Dean)
Pamela Brooks Gann to Claremont-McKenna College (to become President)
Benedict Kingsbury to New York University

Offers outstanding to

James Boyle at American University
Jerome Reichman at Vanderbilt University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Jerome Culp from Rutgers University, Newark
H. Jefferson Powell from the University of Iowa
Neil Vidmar from the University of Western Ontario

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Stewart Schwab from Cornell University

Total faculty size: 33


EMORY UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Johan van der Vyver from the University of Witwaterstrand (South Africa)

Lost to other schools:

Fred McChesney to Cornell University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Harold Berman from Harvard University (emeritus at Harvard)
Peter Hay from the University of Illinois
Jeffrey Pennell from the University of Oklahoma

Current serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Anita Bernstein from Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute ofTechnology
Marci Hamilton from Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University

Total faculty size:   27


GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Alexander Aleinikoff from the University of Michigan
Julie Cohen (untenured) from the University of Pittsburgh
Heidi Feldman (untenured) from the University of Michigan
John H. Jackson from the University of Michigan (emeritus at Michigan)
Donald Langevoort from Vanderbilt University
Richard Lazarus from Washington University, St. Louis
David Luban from the University of Maryland
Carrie Menkel-Meadow from the University of California, Los Angeles
Ronald Pearlman from practice

Lost to other schools:

Anita Allen to the University of Pennsylvania
Lisa Bernstein to the University of Chicago
William Eskridge, Jr. to Yale University
Daniel Halperin to Harvard University
Avery Katz to Columbia University
David Weisbach (untenured) to the University of Chicago

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Anthony Cook from the University of Florida
Charles Lawrence from Stanford University
Mari Matsuda from the University of California, Los Angeles
Mark Tushnet from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Robin West from the University of Maryland

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Michael Knoll from the University of Southern California
Laura Underkuffler from Duke University

Total faculty size:   86


GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Raj Bhala from the College of William & Mary
William Bratton from Rutgers University, Newark
Robert Cottrol from Rutgers University, Camden
William Kovacic from George Mason University
Richard Pierce, Jr. from Columbia University
Michael Young from Columbia University (as Dean)

Lost to other schools:

Harold Bruff to the University of Colorado (to become Dean)
Thomas Morgan to Brigham Young University
Theodore Sims to Boston University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Thomas Buergenthal from Emory University
Jack Friedenthal from Stanford University (as Dean)
Philip Hamburger from the University of Connecticut
Ira Lupu from Boston University
Stephen Saltzburg from the University of Virginia

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Brian Bix from Quinnipiac College

Total faculty size:   65


HARVARD UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Einer Elhauge from the University of California, Berkeley
Lani Guinier from the University of Pennsylvania
Daniel Halperin from Georgetown University
Lawrence Lessig from the University of Chicago
J. Mark Ramseyer from the University of Chicago
William Stuntz from the University of Virginia
W. Kip Viscusi from the Economics Department, Duke University
Elizabeth Warren from the University of Pennsylvania

Lost to other schools:

no one

Offers outstanding to:

Michael McConnell at the University of Utah

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Mary Ann Glendon from Boston College
Reinier Kraakman from Yale University
Robert Mnookin from Stanford University
Joseph William Singer from Boston University
Joseph Weiler from the University of Michigan

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Stephen Burbank from the University of Pennsylvania
George Fisher from Stanford University
Janet Halley from Stanford University
A. Mitchell Polinsky from Stanford University
Mark Roe from Columbia University
Michael Schill from New York University
William Simon from Stanford University
Lynn Stout from Georgetown University
George Triantis from the University of Chicago
Robert A. Williams, Jr. from the University of Arizona

Total faculty size:   70


NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Barry Adler from the University of Virginia
William Allen from practice
John Ferejohn from the Department of Political Science, Stanford University (part-time)
David Garland from the University of Edinburgh
Clayton Gillette from the University of Virginia
Benedict Kingsbury from Duke University
Michael Schill from the University of Pennsylvania

Lost to other schools:

Lea Brilmayer to Yale University
Michael Klausner to Stanford University
Charles Knapp to the University of California, Hastings (emeritus at NYU)

Offers outstanding to

Joseph Bankman at Stanford University
Barbara Fried at Stanford University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Larry Kramer from the University of Michigan
Geoffrey Miller from the University of Chicago
Daniel Shaviro from the University of Chicago
Richard Stewart from Harvard University
Frank Upham from Boston College

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Barry Friedman from Vanderbilt University
Henry Hansmann from Yale University
Stephen Perry from the University of Pennsylvania
Richard Pildes from the University of Michigan
Deborah Rhode from Stanford University
Steven Shavell from Harvard University
Anne-Marie Slaughter from Harvard University

Total faculty size:   80

Note: In their infamously hyperbolic and widely distributed alumni magazine--which one Stanford professor has dubbed "law porn"--NYU has advertised as "major" appointments to the faculty (1) those who hold adjunct appointments at NYU, and a real appointment elsewhere, (2) those who hold appointments primarily in other departments at NYU, and are "affiliated" with the law school, (3) clinical appointments, and (4) those faculty in their dotage who spent their career elsewhere before setting up some relationship with NYU. I have omitted those appointments here, to focus on the genuine appointments of academic faculty in the law school.


NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

David Dana from Boston University
Shari Diamond from the Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago
Andrew Koppelman (untenured) from the Department of Politics, Princeton University
James Lindgren from Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute of Technology
Fred McChesney from Cornell University
Dorothy E. Roberts from Rugers University, Newark

Lost to other schools:

Kathryn Abrams to Cornell University
John J. Donohue III to Stanford University
Stephen A. Gardbaum to the University of California, Los Angeles
Keith Hylton to Boston University
Gary Lawson to Boston University
Laura Lin (untenured) to a non-academic position
Elizabeth Mertz (untenured) to the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Michael J. Perry to Wake Forest University
Daniel Polsby to George Mason University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

David Haddock from the Department of Economics, Emory University
Philip Postlewaite from the University of Notre Dame
Paul Robinson from Rutgers University, Camden
Richard E. Speidel from Boston University

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Philip Hamburger from George Washington University
Kimberly Krawiec from the University of Oregon

Total faculty size:   31


STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Bernard Black from Columbia University
Richard Craswell from the University of Chicago
John J. Donohue III from Northwestern University
Deborah Hensler from the University of Southern California
Pamela Karlan from the University of Virginia
Michael Klausner from New York University
Jeff Strnad from the University of Southern California

Lost to other schools:

John Hart Ely to the University of Miami
Robert W. Gordon to Yale University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Gerhard Casper from the University of Chicago (as President of the University)
Margaret Jane Radin from the University of Southern California
Kathleen Sullivan from Harvard University

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Amy Chua from Duke University
Rebecca Eisenberg from the University of Michigan
Jed Rubenfeld from Yale University

Total faculty size:   34


UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Hired laterally:

James Anaya from the University of Iowa
Jean Braucher from the University of Cincinnati

Lost to other schools:

Mark L. Ascher to the University of Texas, Austin
Lynn A. Baker to the University of Texas, Austin
Katherine Francke (untenured) to Fordham University
David Golove (untenured) to Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University
Joel Seligman to Washington University, St. Louis (to become Dean)
E. Thomas Sullivan to the University of Minnesota (to become Dean)

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Robert Jerome Glennon from Wayne State University
Toni Massaro from the University of Florida
Ted Schneyer from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Elliott Weiss from Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University
Robert A. Williams, Jr. from the University of Wisconsin, Madison

Total faculty size:   27


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Hired laterally:

Stephen Choi (untenured) from the University of Chicago
Lauren Edelman from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Philip Frickey from the University of Minnesota
Mark Lemley from the University of Texas, Austin
Pamela Samuelson from the University of Pittsburgh

Lost to other schools:

Einer Elhauge to Harvard University
Daniel Rodriguez to the University of San Diego (to become Dean)
Edward Rubin to the University of Pennsylvania
Jeremy Waldron to the Department of Politics, Princeton University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Malcolm Feeley from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Robert Merges from Boston University
Daniel Rubinfeld from the Department of Economics, University of Michigan
Joseph Sax from the University of Michigan
Franklin Zimring from the University of Chicago

Total faculty size:   41


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, HASTINGS

Hired laterally:

Vik Amar from the University of California, Davis
Charles Knapp from New York University (emeritus at NYU)
Roger C. Park from the University of Minnesota

Lost to other schools:

no one

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Joseph Grodin from the California Supreme Court
Dan Fenno Henderson from the University of Washington, Seattle (emeritus at Washington)
Richard L. Marcus from the University of Illinois
Ugo Mattei from the University of Trento (Italy) (part-time)
William Wang from the University of San Diego

Total faculty size:   47


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES

Hired laterally:

Stephen Bainbridge from the University of Illinois
Stephen Gardbaum from Northwestern University
Cheryl Harris from Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute of Technology
Lynn LoPucki from Cornell University

Lost to other schools:

Evan Caminker to the University of Michigan
Kimberle Crenshaw to Columbia University
William Forbath to the University of Texas, Austin
Mark Grady to George Mason University (to become Dean)
Carrie Menkel-Meadow to Georgetown University
John Setear to the University of Virginia

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Peter Arenella from Boston University
Joel Handler from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Stephen R. Munzer from the University of Minnesota
Grant Nelson from the University of Missouri, Columbia
Cruz Reynoso from practice

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

William van Alstyne from Duke University

Total faculty size:   55


UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

Hired laterally:

Lisa Bernstein from Georgetown University
Mary Anne Case from the University of Virginia
Jack Goldsmith (untenured) from the University of Virginia
Saul Levmore from the University of Virginia
Martha Nussbaum from the Department of Philosophy, Brown University
Eric Posner from the University of Pennsylvania
Julie Roin from the University of Virginia
George Triantis from the University of Virginia
David Weisbach (untenured) from Georgetown University

Lost to other schools:

Mary Becker to DePaul University
Stephen Choi (untenured) to the University of California, Berkeley
Richard Craswell to Stanford University
Stephen Holmes to the Department of Politics, Princeton University
Dan Kahan to Yale University
Daniel Klerman (untenured) to the University of Southern California
Lawrence Lessig to Harvard University
Michael McConnell to the University of Utah
J. Mark Ramseyer to Harvard University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Albert Alschuler from the University of Pennsylvania
Daniel Fischel from Northwestern University
R.H. Helmholz from Washington University, St. Louis
Stephen Schulhofer from the University of Pennsylvania

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

C. Edwin Baker from the University of Pennsylvania
Daniel Farber from the University of Minnesota
Philip Hamburger from George Washington University
John Manning from Columbia University
Andrei Marmor from Tel-Aviv University

Total faculty size:   31


UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO

Hired laterally:

Harold Bruff from George Washington University (as Dean)

Lost to other schools:

Gene Nichol to the University of North Carolina (to become Dean)
Steven D. Smith to the University of Notre Dame

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Richard Delgado from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Christopher Mueller from the University of Illinois
Dale Oesterle from Cornell University
Pierre Schlag from the University of Puget Sound (now Seattle University)
Charles Wilkinson from the University of Oregon

Total faculty size:   30


UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Hired laterally:

Richard McAdams from Boston University
Richard Painter from the University of Oregon

Lost to other schools:

Stephen Bainbridge to the University of California, Los Angeles
Donald Dripps to the University of Minnesota
Steven L. Harris to Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute of Technology
Deborah Merritt to Ohio State University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Matthew Finkin from Southern Methodist University

Total faculty size:   31


UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

Hired laterally:

Randall Bezanson from Washington & Lee University
Margaret Brinig from George Mason University

Lost to other schools:

James Anaya to the University of Arizona
Mary Dudziak to the University of Southern California

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Herbert Hovenkamp from the University of California, Hastings
Jean Love from the University of California, Davis
Mark Osiel from Tulane University
Michael Saks from the Department of Psychology, Boston College
John-Mark Stensvaag from Vanderbilt University

Total faculty size:   44


UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

Hired laterally:

Reuven S. Avi-Yonah (untenured) from Harvard University
Omri Ben-Shahar from Tel-Aviv University
Evan Caminker from the University of California, Los Angeles
James Hathaway from York University (Canada)
Robert Howse from the University of Toronto
Ronald Mann (untenured) from Washington University, St. Louis
Jane Schacter from the University of Wisconsin, Madison

Lost to other schools:

Alexander Aleinikoff to Georgetown University
José Alvarez to Columbia University
Michael H. Bradley to Duke University
Jerold Israel to the University of Florida (took early retirement at Michigan)
John H. Jackson to Georgetown University (took early retirement at Michigan)
Avery Katz to Georgetown University
Kent Syverud to Vanderbilt University (to become Dean)

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Merritt Fox from Indiana University, Bloomington
Richard Friedman from Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University
James Krier from the University of California, Los Angeles
William Ian Miller from the University of Houston
James Boyd White from the University of Chicago

Total faculty size:   58


UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

Hired laterally:

Donald Dripps from the University of Illinois
E. Thomas Sullivan from the University of Arizona (as Dean)
Mark Yudof from the University of Texas, Austin (as President of the University)

Lost to other schools:

Philip Frickey to the University of California, Berkeley
Steve H. Nickles to Wake Forest University
Roger C. Park to the University of California, Hastings
Steven Penrod to the University of Nebraska, Lincoln

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Daniel Farber from the University of Illinois
Mary Louise Fellows from the University of Iowa
Michael Tonry from practice (formerly at the University of Maryland)

Total faculty size:   33


UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA, CHAPEL HILL

Hired laterally:

John O. Calmore from Loyola Law School, Los Angeles
Marian G. Crain from the University of Toledo
Gene Nichol from the University of Colorado (as Dean)

Lost to other schools:

no one

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Thomas Lee Hazen from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln
Marilyn V. Yarbrough from the University of Tennessee
Lawrence A. Zelenak from Lewis & Clark College/Northwestern School of Law

Total faculty size:   35


UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

Hired laterally:

John Finnis from Oxford University (part-time appointment)
Dinah L. Shelton from Santa Clara University
Steven D. Smith from the University of Colorado

Lost to other schools:

John Garvey to Boston College (to become Dean)
Douglas Kmiec to Pepperdine University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

G. Robert Blakey from Cornell University
Gerard V. Bradley from the University of Illinois
Alan Gunn from Cornell University

Total faculty size:   26


UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

Hired laterally:

Anita Allen from Georgetown University
Howard Chang from the University of Southern California
Stephen Perry from McGill University
Edward Rubin from the University of California, Berkeley
Kim Lane Scheppele from the Department of Political Science, University of Michigan
David Skeel from Temple University

Lost to other schools:

Lani Guinier to Harvard University
Eric Posner to the University of Chicago
Michael Schill to New York University
Elizabeth Warren to Harvard University

Offers outstanding to:

Michael Knoll at the University of Southern California

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

C. Edwin Baker from the University of Oregon
Colin Diver from Boston University (as Dean)
Geoffrey C. Hazard, Jr. from Yale University (part-time appointment; also Director of the American Law Institute in Philadelphia)(emeritus at Yale)
Michael Moore from the University of California, Berkeley
Stephen Morse from the University of Southern California

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Paul Butler from George Washington University
Marcella David from the University of Iowa
Marc Fajer from the University of Miami
Kathryn Heidt from the University of Pittsburgh
Tracy Higgins from Fordham University
Francis Hill from the University of Denver
Eric Kades from Wayne State University

Total faculty size:   34


UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

Hired laterally:

Jody Armour from the University of Pittsburgh
Mary Dudziak from the University of Iowa
Daniel Klerman (untenured) from the University of Chicago

Lost to other schools:

Howard Chang to the University of Pennsylvania
Dennis Curtis to Yale University
Deborah Hensler to Stanford University
Judith Resnik to Yale University
Jeff Strnad to Stanford University
Catherine Wells to Boston College

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Jennifer Arlen from Emory University
Alexander Capron from Georgetown University
Erwin Chemerinsky from DePaul University
Susan Estrich from Harvard University
Charles H. Whitebread II from the University of Virginia

Total faculty size:   33


UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, AUSTIN

Hired laterally:

Mark L. Ascher from the University of Arizona
Lynn A. Baker from the University of Arizona
William E. Forbath from the University of California, Los Angeles
Brian Leiter from the University of San Diego
Basil Markesinis from Oxford University (part-time appointment)

Lost to other schools:

Cynthia Estlund to Columbia University
Samuel Issacharoff to Columbia University
Mark Lemley to the University of California, Berkeley
Edward Sherman to Tulane University (to become Dean)
Michael Tigar to American University
Mark Yudof to the University of Minnesota (to become President)

Offers outstanding to:

Laura Kalman in the Department of History, University of California, Santa Barbara

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Julius Getman from Yale University
Douglas Laycock from the University of Chicago
Sanford Levinson (untenured) from the Department of Politics, Princeton University
John A. Robertson from the University of Wisconsin, Madison
Gerald Torres from the University of Minnesota

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

David Hyman from the University of Maryland
Russell Korobkin from the University of Illinois
Andrew Kull from Emory University
Rachel Moran from the University of California, Berkeley

Total faculty size:   61


UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

Hired laterally:

Vincent Blasi from Columbia University (part-time appointment)
Anne Coughlin from Vanderbilt University
Barry Cushman from St. Louis University
Chris Sanchirico (untenured) from the Economics Department, Columbia University
John Setear from the University of California, Los Angeles

Lost to other schools:

Barry Adler to New York University
Mary Anne Case to the University of Chicago
Clayton Gillette to New York University
Jack Goldsmith (untenured) to the University of Chicago
Pamela Karlan to Stanford University
Saul Levmore to the University of Chicago
Julie Roin to the University of Chicago
William Stuntz to Harvard University
George Triantis to the University of Chicago

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Kenneth Abraham from the University of Maryland
George M. Cohen from the University of Pittsburgh
Edmund Kitch from the University of Chicago
Steven Walt from the University of San Diego
George Yin from the University of Florida

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Curtis Bradley from the University of Colorado
Thomas Merrill from Northwestern University
Stephen Morse from the University of Pennsylvania

Total faculty size:   63


UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, MADISON

Hired laterally:

Jane Larson (denied tenure) from Northwestern University
Elizabeth Mertz (untenured) from Northwestern University

Lost to other schools:

Lauren Edelman to the University of California, Berkeley
Jane Schacter to the University of Michigan

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Linda Greene from practice (formerly at the University of Oregon)
Beverly Moran from the University of Cincinnati
Joel Rogers from the University of Miami

Total faculty size:   36


VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Kent Syverud from the University of Michigan (as Dean)

Lost to other schools:

Donald Langevoort to Georgetown University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Jon W. Bruce from Stetson University
Margaret Howard from St. Louis University
David Partlett from the Australian National University
Jerome H. Reichman from Ohio State University
Larry D. Soderquist from the University of Notre Dame

Total faculty size:   29


WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, ST. LOUIS

Hired laterally:

Rebecca Dresser from Case Western Reserve University
John Owen Haley from the University of Washington, Seattle
Joel Seligman from the University of Arizona (as Dean)

Lost to other schools:

Richard Lazarus to Georgetown University
Ronald J. Mann to the University of Michigan
Curtis Milhaupt to Columbia University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Peter Wiedenbeck from the University of Missouri, Columbia

Total faculty size:   31


YALE UNIVERSITY

Hired laterally:

Anne Alstott from Columbia University
Lea Brilmayer from New York University
Dennis Curtis from the University of Southern California
William Eskridge, Jr. from Georgetown University
Dan Kahan from the University of Chicago
Robert W. Gordon from Stanford University
Judith Resnik from the University of Southern California

Lost to other schools:

no one

Offers outstanding to:

Aaron Edlin at the University of California, Berkeley
Lawrence Lessig at Harvard University

Some major lateral hires 1980-1994:

Jack Balkin from the University of Texas, Austin
Jules Coleman from the Department of Philosophy, University of Arizona
Robert Ellickson from Stanford University
Carol Rose from Northwestern University
Alan Schwartz from the University of Southern California

Serious visitors, 1999-2000, include:

Douglas Baird from the University of Chicago
John J. Donohue III from Stanford University
Katherine van Wezel Stone from Cornell University

Total faculty size:   41


TOP CHOICES BY SPECIALTY AREA

This list was compiled in consultation with various experts in the different fields, as well as by consulting various anthologies of leading articles in each field. For each field, I list a half-dozen-or-so especially strong schools. The list is largely confined to the top 15 schools, other than in exceptional cases. Note that these lists sometimes differ from the lists compiled by U.S. News, in which academics in the area are asked to list ten or fifteen strong "programs" in these areas. Schools with established "programs" may not necessarily be schools with academically distinguished faculty in the area. What follows is based on faculty quality in the area. Please keep in mind that any good school will offer instruction in most or all of these fields. These lists simply flag the schools with the most outstanding faculties in the various areas.

Administrative Law

Columbia University
George Washington University
New York University
Northwestern University
University of Chicago
University of Pennsylvania
University of Virginia
Yale University

Bankruptcy

Harvard University
New York University
University of Chicago
University of Texas, Austin
Vanderbilt University
Yale University

Civil Procedure

Duke University
Harvard University
University of California, Hastings
University of Pennsylvania
University of Texas, Austin
Yale University

Commercial Law

Harvard University
New York University
Stanford University
University of Chicago
University of Michigan
University of Virginia
Yale University

Comparative Law

Columbia University
Harvard University
University of Michigan
University of Pennsylvania
University of Texas, Austin
Yale University

Constitutional Law: Freedom of Religion

Case Western Reserve University
Columbia University
George Washington University
New York University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Texas, Austin
University of Utah

Constitutional Law: Freedom of Speech

Columbia University
Cornell University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Chicago
University of Pennsylvania
University of Texas, Austin
University of Virginia
Yale University

Constitutional Law-General (incl. theories of constitutional interpretation)

Columbia University
Duke University
Georgetown University
Harvard University
Stanford University
University of Chicago
University of Miami
University of Texas, Austin
Yale University

Corporate Law and Securities Regulation

Columbia University
Harvard University
New York University
Stanford University
University of Chicago
Yale University

Criminal Law (substantive)

Columbia University
Northwestern University
University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Los Angeles
University of Chicago
University of Pennsylvania

Criminal Procedure

Harvard University
University of Chicago
University of Florida
University of Michigan
Yale University

Critical Race Theory

Columbia University
Duke University
Georgetown University
New York University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Colorado

Environmental Law

Chicago-Kent College of Law/Illinois Institute of Technology
Georgetown University
New York University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Texas, Austin
University of Washington, Seattle
Yale University

Feminist Legal Theory

Cornell University
Duke University
Georgetown University
Harvard University
Stanford University
University of California, Los Angeles
University of Chicago
University of Michigan

Health Law (excluding medical ethics)

Duke University
Georgetown University
Ohio State University
University of Houston
University of Maryland

International Law

Columbia University
Georgetown University
Harvard University
New York University
Yale University

Intellectual Property

Boston University
Columbia University
New York University
Stanford University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Texas, Austin

Jurisprudence

Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University
Columbia University
New York University
University of California, Los Angeles
University of Michigan
University of Pennsylvania
University of Texas, Austin
Yale University

Labor Law

Columbia University
Cornell University
Harvard University
Northeastern University
Ohio State University
University of Illinois
University of Pennsylvania
University of Texas, Austin

Law and Economics

Columbia University
Harvard University
New York University
Stanford University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Chicago
University of Pennsylvania
Yale University

Law and Religion (excluding First Amendment issues)

Duke University
Emory University
University of Georgia
University of Notre Dame
Wake Forest University
Yale University

Law and Social Science (incl. Psychology and Sociology)

Northwestern University
University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Los Angeles
University of Michigan
University of Pennsylvania
University of Virginia
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Legal Ethics/Professional Responsibility/Legal Profession

Boston University
Georgetown University
Stanford University
University of Pennsylvania
University of Texas, Austin
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Yale University

Legal History

Harvard University
New York University
Stanford University
University of Michigan
University of Texas, Austin
University of Virginia
Yale University

Moral and Political Theory (Anglo-American traditions)

Boston University
Columbia University
New York University
University of California, Berkeley
University of Michigan
Yale University

Moral and Political Theory (Continental traditions)

Cardozo Law School/Yeshiva University
University of Chicago
University of Texas, Austin
Yale University

Tax

Harvard University
New York University
Stanford University
University of Chicago
University of Texas, Austin
Yale University

Torts (including products liability)

Cornell University
University of California, Los Angeles
University of Chicago
University of Texas, Austin
University of Virginia
Yale University

Footnote:
[1]   UCLA may be the only exception among the EQR top 15 to this generalization.

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